Subdivision Tips, South Australia (C: +61431138537), https://www.facebook.com/RealEstateSA5000/

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Tech breakthroughs take a backseat in upcoming Apple iPhone launch

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN1620FP Thu Feb 23, 2017 | 6:55 AM EST 17h ago | 01:27 Apple aims for maximum impact with next iPhone Tech breakthroughs take a backseat in upcoming... X By Stephen Nellis | SAN FRANCISCO When Apple Inc (AAPL.O) launches its much-anticipated 10th anniversary iPhone this fall, it will offer an unwitting lesson in how much the smartphone industry it pioneered has matured. The new iPhone is expected to include new features such as high-resolution displays, wireless charging and 3-D sensors. Rather than representing major breakthroughs, however, most of the innovations have been available in competing phones for several years. Apple's relatively slow adoption of new features both reflects and reinforces the fact smartphone customers are holding onto their phones longer. Timothy Arcuri, an analyst at Cowen & Co, believes upwards of 40 percent of iPhones on the market are more than two years old, a historical high. That is a big reason why investors have driven Apple shares to an all-time high. There is pent-up demand for a new iPhone, even if it does not offer breakthrough technologies. It is not clear whether Apple deliberately held off on packing some of the new features into the current iPhone 7, which has been criticized for a lack of differentiation from its predecessor. Apple declined to comment on the upcoming product. Still, the development and roll-out of the anniversary iPhone suggest Apple’s product strategy is driven less by technological innovation than by consumer upgrade cycles and Apple’s own business and marketing needs. "When a market gets saturated, the growth is all about refresh," said Bob O’Donnell of Technalysis Research. "This is exactly what happened to PCs. It's exactly what happened to tablets. It's starting to happen to smartphones." ADVERTISEMENT . Apple is close-mouthed about upcoming product features, but analysts and reports from Asian component suppliers and others indicate that high-resolution displays based on OLED technology -- possibly with curved edges -- are likely to be part of the anniversary phone. A radical new design is not expected, according to analysts. Some of the anticipated new technologies, notably wireless charging, remain messy. Samsung Electronics Co Ltd (005930.KS) phones, for example, feature wireless charging but support two different sets of standards, one called Qi and the other AirFuel. Apple recently joined the group backing Qi. But there are still at least five different groups working on wireless charging technology within Apple, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. As to 3-D sensors, there is already one hiding in the iPhone 7. The front camera features what is known as a time-of-flight sensor, which helps it autofocus and is used in numerous phones including the Blackberry, according to TechInsights, a firm that examines the chips inside tech devices. ‹ 3/3 FILE PHOTO - A customer buys the new iPhone 7 smartphone inside an Apple Inc. store in Los Angeles, California, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson/File Photo 1/3 FILE PHOTO - An Apple iPhone 7 and the company logo are seen in this illustration picture taken in Bordeaux, France on February 1, 2017. Reuters/Regis Duvignau/File Photo 2/3 FILE PHOTO - A customer buys the new iPhone 7 smartphone inside an Apple Inc. store in Los Angeles, California, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson/File Photo 3/3 FILE PHOTO - A customer buys the new iPhone 7 smartphone inside an Apple Inc. store in Los Angeles, California, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson/File Photo 1/3 FILE PHOTO - An Apple iPhone 7 and the company logo are seen in this illustration picture taken in Bordeaux, France on February 1, 2017. Reuters/Regis Duvignau/File Photo › That sensor could be upgraded to a higher-resolution version that could handle 3-D mapping for facial recognition, said Jim Morrison, vice president at TechInsights. Some analysts also speculate the company could remove the phone's home button, placing it and a fingerprint sensor beneath the front display glass, based on patents the company has filed. SLOW GROWTH Global smartphone sales were up only 2.3 percent to 1.47 billion units in 2016, according to IDC. Many carriers in the United States have stopped subsidizing phones, causing phone buyers to think harder about their next purchase. Apple will likely make a heavy marketing push around the phone’s 10th anniversary. “IPhone set the standard for mobile computing in its first decade and we are just getting started. The best is yet to come,” Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook said in a statement Jan. 8, the date the iPhone was announced by then-CEO Steve Jobs in 2007. In 2015, the last year it disclosed the figure, Apple spent $1.8 billion on advertising, up 50 percent from the year before and nearly four times the $467 million it spent in 2007 when it first released the iPhone. And the company continues to excel at selling higher-priced phones. Chief Financial Officer Luca Maestri attributed the most recent quarter's record-setting 78.3 million iPhones sold to the iPhone 7 Plus, which for the first time included a new dual camera feature not found in other models. The iPhone 7 Plus tops out at $969 with memory upgrades and a jet black finish. O'Donnell of Technalysis Research believes that with the next iPhone, Apple might even introduce a $1,000-plus “ultra-premium device for the real Apple-crazed folks out there who want to stand out." (Reporting by Stephen Nellis; Editing by Jonathan Weber and Lisa Shumaker)

Friday, February 17, 2017

Brisbane’s Redbank shopping centre sells for $160m

February 3, 2017 Matthew Cranston Property Editor Redbank Plains retail centre, south of Brisbane, services an area estimated at more than 50,600 residents with robust forecast population growth in the next decade. Photo: Supplied Alceon and Brisbane-based developer Capital Transactions have sold their sub-regional shopping centre development at Redbank Plains, south of the city, for $160 million to Singapore’s Rockworth Capital Partners. Rockworth already has more than $700 million in assets under management comprising primarily retail properties in Australia. Rockworth Asset Management executive director Lim Su Kiat was unable to give details on the deal, which was struck on a yield of about 6 per cent through JLL’s Simon Rooney and Sam Hatcher. “I can’t go into specifics,” Mr Lim said, ” but we are always looking for different retail assets.” The 27,000-square-metre centre is anchored by a Woolworths, Coles, Aldi, Target and Daiso and is currently 95 per cent leased following a 20,000-square-metre expansion by Alceon and Capital Transactions. Alceon and Capital Transactions snapped up the Redbank Plains Shopping Village and adjoining land from Queensland coal entrepreneur Paul Darrouzet in 2013 before undertaking the major expansion. The centre serves a trade area estimated at more than 50,600 residents with robust forecast population growth of nearly 65,200 people in the next decade. Yields squeezed Alceon proceeded to appoint JLL to sell the asset in 2015 at a time when demand for sub-regional centres was increasing rapidly. With a shortage of sub-regional malls available to transact, yields have been squeezed in the sector over the past 12 months by about 40 basis points. The average yield on such malls now stands at less than 6.61 per cent nationally. Major recent transactions include Charter Hall Retail REIT’s purchase of Arana Hills Plaza in Brisbane and an adjoining Shell petrol station from super fund investor ISPT for $67.1 million, sold also through JLL. In December British investment giant M&G Real Estate bought Scentre Group’s Casey Central Shopping Centre in the far south of Melbourne for more than $220 million and set a new record for yields on sub-regional shopping centres. M&G Real Estate, one of the world’s largest property investors, purchased the centre on a fully leased yield of about 5.5 per cent. The closest yields for sub-regionals over $100 million include Runaway Bay in Queensland, on 5.91 per cent fully leased, and The Shops at Ellenbrook in Western Australia on 5.75 per cent.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Trump says he will bring down the price of wall on Mexico's border

Sat Feb 11, 2017 | 11:26 AM EST Trump says he will bring down the price of wall on Mexico's border A U.S. flag is seen next to a section of the wall separating Mexico and the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, January 28, 2017. Reuters/Jorge Duenes Trump says he will bring down the price of wall on... X President Donald Trump pushed back early on Saturday on assertions that the wall he wants built on the U.S. border with Mexico would cost more than anticipated and said he would reduce the price. Trump made his comments in two Twitter posts but did not say how he would bring down the cost of the wall. Reuters on Thursday published details of an internal report by the Department of Homeland Security that estimated the price of a wall along the entire border at $21.6 billion. During his presidential campaign Trump had cited a $12 billion figure. "I am reading that the great border WALL will cost more than the government originally thought, but I have not gotten involved in the ... design or negotiations yet," Trump tweeted from his Florida resort, where he is hosting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. "When I do, just like with the F-35 FighterJet or the Air Force One Program, price will come WAY DOWN!" ADVERTISING Trump, who took office on Jan. 20, said in late January that his administration had been able to cut some $600 million from a deal to buy about 90 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters from Lockheed Martin. Defense analysts and sources downplayed news of those cuts, saying the discount hailed by Trump was in line with what had been flagged by Lockheed for months and would apply to other countries committed to the program. A border wall to stem illegal immigration was one of Trump's main campaign promises. He has vowed to make Mexico reimburse the United States for its cost but Mexico has repeatedly said it will not do so. Trump also tweeted on Saturday about another aspect of his immigration policy - the legal battle over the presidential order banning entry to the United States by refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries. "Our legal system is broken! '77% of refugees allowed into U.S. since travel reprieve hail from seven suspect countries.' (WT) SO DANGEROUS!" he said. The tweet was in apparent reaction to a Washington Times story saying 77 percent of the 1,100 refugees who have entered the United States since Feb. 3 are from the countries covered by Trump's ban. A federal judge in Seattle blocked Trump's executive order on Feb. 3, lifting the ban while litigation proceeds. Trump has been steadily critical of the ruling from Seattle and a subsequent appeals court ruling upholding it. (Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Bill Trott)

Rolling blackouts ordered as Adelaide swelters in heatwave

SES advice on SA heatwave SA News Rolling blackouts ordered as Adelaide swelters in heatwave Ben Harvy, Tory Shepherd, The Advertiser February 9, 2017 10:59am No guarantee power won’t be cut again today Adelaide hits 42C — and Moomba’s over 46C Meanwhile, Sydney has a storm and it keeps running Turnbull calls SA a socialist paradise, says it needs home generators Shipyards get backup power generators SA POWER Networks was ordered on Wednesday night to restore electricity to about 40,000 households and businesses after supplies were deliberately cut amid soaring temperatures. Power to customers across the state was switched off from 6.33pm under “rotational load shedding’’ orders from the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) “due to lack of available generation supply in SA”, SA Power Networks said. About 45 minutes later electricity was restored after SA Power Networks announced that AEMO had ordered it to return supply. “AEMO has called an end to load shedding, we are restoring power,’’ the supplier said. As customers reacted with outrage, the blame game immediately began. State Energy Minister Tom Koutsantonis said: “Every South Australian has a right to be angry. We had spare capacity in the SA generation market and the market didn’t turn that generation on.” “The second unit at Pelican Point (power station) could’ve been turned on last night, it had gas, was ready to go and it wasn’t turned on. The national market isn’t working,” he said. “We (the State Government) have been taking advice from the market operator and others but after last night we have to reassess. We will do what’s necessary to make sure SA has sufficient generation,” Mr Koutsantonis said. “It’s my understanding that AEMO (Australian Energy Market Operator) was made aware more generation was available and chose not to turn that generation on. Serious questions have to be asked about why we had generation available that wasn’t used.” The SA Power Network outages map at 7.23pm. The temperature was still above 40C when the rolling blackouts began at 6.33pm to conserve power supplies as homeowners used airconditioners for relief from the heat. SA’s power reliability will again be under scrutiny given a series of major blackouts, including a statewide failure in September. An SA Power Networks spokesman said they were acting on instructions from AEMO in response to insufficient generation supply in SA. “We don’t generate,” he said. “This is not an SA Power Networks issue — we are the muggins in the middle between the customer and generation supply.” SA Liberal frontbencher Simon Birmingham said it was “yet another example that the South Australian Government can’t keep the lights on”. “It’s a chronic failing that can only hurt investment confidence in the state,” Mr Birmingham said. “It’s a demonstration that ad hoc state-based renewable energy targets have gone too far — when reliability can’t be maintained on a day the likes of which SA faces numerous times every single summer.” Federal Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg said the blackout “is yet another example of Jay Weatherill’s failed experiment”. The Pelican Point power station, which the Government said could have been turned on. . “Because of the lack of base load generation there literally wasn’t enough electricity being produced to power the state,” he said. “It’s time Labor both federally and at a state level recognised its high renewable energy targets are putting at risk energy security and affordability.” The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) issued a statement, saying at 6.33pm on Wednesday “approximately 100 megawatts (MW) of local load shedding was instructed in South Australia to maintain the security of the power system.” It said “load shedding” — affecting about 40,000 homes and businesses — was “instructed by AEMO to avoid damage to network equipment due to potential overloading.” At 7pm AEMO gave permission to restore the 100 MW of load, and at about 7.10pm electricity supply had been restored. The Advertiser’s front page for February 9, 2017 Mr Koutsantonis said it was “my understanding that AEMO (Australian Energy Market Operator) was made aware more generation was available and chose not to turn that generation on.” “There were issues during the September blackout where AEMO wasn’t aware of the severe winds but you just needed to turn the TV on to find out how hot it was.” He rejected suggestions that repeated blackouts had turned SA into a national joke, saying: “It makes the National Energy Market look like a joke. We (the State Government) have been taking advice from the market operator and others but after last night we have to reassess. We (the Government) will do what’s necessary to make sure SA has sufficient generation.” Jane Govey, 43, owner of The Bridge Hotel at Langhorne Creek, said she once again had to turn away paying customers, describing the latest blackout as totally “ridiculous”. “We had 20 in for dinner and probably turned another 15, or 20 away. If this had been the only power outage I’d probably not be quite so upset but this is the fourth one in three months that we’ve had,” she said. A Portuguese tourist copes with a hot Adelaide night with the help of the Victoria Square fountain at 10pm, when the temperature in the city was above 32C. Picture: Bernard Humphreys “We’re now looking at upgrading our switchboards to put generators in. “It costs a small fortune but hotels that put generators in don’t have the problems. “It’s a pretty sad state of affairs in a first-world country ... we lived in the UK for 16 years and came back three years ago. I never experienced a power outage like this in the UK.” Angry customers who lost power on dinner time took to social media to express their outrage with the electricity system. They also noted that, yet again, businesses were losing money due to uncertain electricity supplies. “Henley Beach Pizza shop usually packed at 8:30pm ... tonight closed due to blackouts,” Tim Yeatman tweeted. The public also took full advantage of Premier Jay Weatherill’s “Q & Jay” life Facebook session on Wednesday night, with critical comments pouring in. Among them Anthony Hunter wrote: “Here’s a question, why are we having load-shedding power cuts right at this moment, when it’s only one day of hot weather. “Surely the hottest state in Australia can handle one day of heat?” How South Australians are beating the heat Skyelah with friends keeping their cool during the heatwave in the “Fun Bowl” at Roxby Downs. 1 of 16 Sam, 3, chilling out in his tub during the 41C heat at Roxby Downs. 2 of 16 Plant operator Troy Holt remembers to hydrate in the shade after a day working in the Moomba Plant. Picture: Marko Draca. 3 of 16 Skyelah Petty keeps her cool during the heat wave in Roxby Downs. Picture: Supplied 4 of 16 Oz Minerals workers Tammy Jackson-Rothe and Andrew Graziani keep cool in the Far North. Picture: Chris Warrior 5 of 16 German Shepherd Kaiser wades through the water at Yellow Rock. Picture: Mellissa Nilsen. 6 of 16 Marguerita Barone enjoys the water with her son Julian, 1, at Henley Beach. Picture: Keryn Stevens 7 of 16 Terina Cornwall, Judy Perrett and Karen Taubers pull up a pew at the Chimney Hole. 8 of 16 Lucy Pedersen is chilling out in Andamooka. 9 of 16 Elly and Zara Fitzgerald liloing around near the Andamooka Opal fields. 10 of 16 Meanwhile, Adelaide’s searing temperatures this week have been made even more uncomfortable by Darwin-like humidity levels. Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Matt Collopy said a wet couple of days at the start of the week has contributed to the humidity, along with a monsoon over the northern parts of Australia that is currently active. “We’ve seen that continued drawing down of that almost tropical moisture across parts of SA and that is also contributing to the high humidity we’re seeing during this heat event,” he said. At 6am on Tuesday both Adelaide and Darwin had a relative humidity level of 84 per cent. They also reached the same relative humidity level three times on Sunday. Mr Collopy said although Darwin, which is in its wet season, still had a higher relative humidity on average — the conditions were unusual for summer in South Australia. “There was one day in (the last week of January) where we were basically 100 per cent humidity at 9am,” Mr Collopy said. Player Information About Brightcove Heatwave warning for SA residents The humidity is a result of high rainfall and tropical moisture, as the Indian Ocean Dipole breaks down and ocean temperatures off the north west coast of WA remain warmer than average. “We haven’t really got a strong climate driver but still have a very strong wet signal,” he said. It has kept fire conditions out of the severe range, however surgeries at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital could be moved to the Royal Adelaide Hospital if the humidity creates airconditioning issues. SA Health chief medical officer Paddy Phillips said humidity reduces the body’s ability to cool down. He said people should put their health first, before attempting to save a couple of dollars on electricity, by not running fans and airconditioners to keep cool. On Wednesday the mercury soared from 27.5C at 6am in Adelaide to 42.4C by 5pm, while Moomba — the hottest town in SA — reached 46.6C just after 4pm. Ceduna, also recorded 45.3C — 17 degrees above average for February. Roxby Downs mother Lianne Crowther, 30, is a member of the pony club where they have also been trying to keep the horses cool. Beating the heat in Roxby Downs is Grace, 3, with pony Strady and Oivia-Lei, 2, with Poppy. Lianne Crowther She put her daughter Olivia-Lei, 2, and friend Grace Moore, 3, in buckets of water to keep them cool while they tended to the animals. “It’s just so hot out there and it's the only way to keep the girls occupied,” she said. “Grace loved it. We also put them in another trough as well.” Mr Collopy said very hot and very humid conditions were expected until Saturday. Thursday in Adelaide is still forecast to be 41C, Friday is expected to be 39C, and Saturday 37C — with minimum overnight temperatures between 23-24C. A southerly wind will reach the state’s southern coastal towns on Thursday, however Adelaide will not feel that change until Saturday evening. “Temperatures will be dropping back into the mid-20s by the time you get through to Sunday and Monday,” Mr Collopy said. — with Jade Gailberger Hottest SA towns up to 5pm on Wednesday Moomba, 46.6C Tarcoola, 46.3C Roxby Downs, 46C Woomera, 46.1C Ceduna, 46.1C Marree Airport, 45.9C Oodnaddatta, 45.1C Coober Pedy 45.9C Leigh Creek, 45C Adelaide, 42.4C Moomba, 46.6C Coles Point, 43.6C at 1.20pm Comments Show Comments More stories Sister loses legal fight over ex-Lord Mayor’s $58.5m estate Sister loses legal fight over ex-Lord Mayor’s $58.5m estate News Geoffrey Edelsten: ‘I want her jailed’ Geoffrey Edelsten: ‘I want her jailed’ News From around the web This Tennis Superstar’s Australia Home Sold at a Huge Loss This Tennis Superstar’s Australia Home Sold at a Huge Loss realestate.com.au Australians Urged To Review Their Health Insurance Australians Urged To Review Their Health Insurance iSelect Woman kicked off flight over cleavage speaks: ‘I can’t sleep’ Woman kicked off flight over cleavage speaks: ‘I can’t sleep’ news.com.au Small business has 21,500% growth in three years Small business has 21,500% growth in three years SPONSORED CONTENT ‘Hell on Earth’ heat is coming ‘Hell on Earth’ heat is coming news.com.au Got Private Health Insurance? 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Tuesday, February 07, 2017

Iran says U.S. sanctions stop American oil firms taking part in projects

Iran has imposed no restrictions on U.S. oil firms willing to participate in energy projects in the country but American sanctions make such cooperation impossible, Iran's deputy oil minister said on Monday. "Iran has not imposed any restrictions on the U.S. companies, but they cannot participate in our (oil and gas) tenders due to the U.S. laws," Amir Hossein Zamaninia, deputy oil minister for trade and international affairs, was quoted as saying by state news agency IRNA. "Based on the U.S. Congress sanctions, the American oil companies cannot work in Iran," he added. ADVERTISING Iran said on Saturday that it will hold the country's first tender in mid-February since the lifting of international sanctions to develop oil and natural gas fields. OPEC's No. 3 oil producer hopes to draw foreign companies to invest in Iran and boost output after years of under-investment. However, foreign firms have so far made little inroads into the country despite the lifting of sanctions. President Donald Trump's new U.S. administration on Friday imposed fresh sanctions on Iran, which it said were just initial steps. It said Washington would no longer turn a "blind eye" to Iran's hostile actions. Dismissing the new sanctions, Zamaninia said "such actions have had no effect, and international companies are still keen to do business with Iran." Also In Commodities Mining stocks upstage oil as investors scour for reflation trades Oil extends losses as gasoline weighs down prices Anglo-Dutch oil firm Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) signed a provisional deal in December to develop Iranian oil and gas fields South Azadegan, Yadavaran and Kish. (Reporting by Bozorgmehr Sharafedin; Editing by Adrian Croft)

Monday, February 06, 2017

Most affordable suburbs to invest: TOP TEN SUBURBS by compound annual growth

These are the most affordable suburbs close to capital cities for investors to look out for in 2016 January 21, 20164:14pm Mansfield Park was listed by realestate.com.au as an investment spot to look out for in 2016. This home at 2A Kent St, is listed for $430,000 to $440,000. Picture: realestate.com.au Michelle Hele Network online real estate editor News Corp Australia Network TWO states dominate the list of suburbs for investors to keep an eye on in 2016. Suburbs in Western Australia and South Australia have been labelled by realestate.com.au as the best affordable suburbs to invest based on their strong compound annual growth in 2015. South Australia’s Mansfield Park topped the list of suburbs for three-bedroom homes less than $400,000 and within 20km of the CBD. It had a median house price of $375,000 and had a compound annual growth of 6.8 per cent last year. There were seven Western Australia suburbs on the list, with Maddington the most prominent. It had a median house price of $366,500 and recorded compound annual growth of 4.1 per cent last year. Dahlia Rechichi of LJ Hooker Thornlie who grew up in Maddington said the suburb was a real mixed bag of property types. She said the newer product tended to sell fairly quickly, although anything older which needed a bit of work did not sell so fast. 20 Lancaster Place, Maddington is listed for offers from $409,000. Picture: realestate.com.auSource:Supplied “It has been an area that has been a little left behind, but it is a good investment area,’’ she said. “A lot of land is starting to get rezoned and there are a lot of apartments underway.’’ Ms Rechichi said the price bracket for the suburb was one in which first home buyers and investors generally bought, but with banks cracking down on investor lending, that side of the market had quietened down a little. TOP TEN SUBURBS by compound annual growth Mansfield Park, SA - 6.8 per cent Maddington, WA - 4.1 per cent Salisbury Heights, SA - 4 per cent Langford, WA - 3.4 per cent Midvale, WA - 2.9 per cent Kenwick, WA - 2.8 per cent Middle Swan, WA - 2.8 per cent Gosnells, WA - 2.7 per cent Huntingdale, WA - 2.6 per cent Queenstown, SA - 2.6 per cent Originally published as Most affordable suburbs to invest ============ What to do if your tenants go AWOL Nicola McDougall Home / What to do if your tenants go AWOL Sometimes no matter how stringent your property management systems, tenants go AWOL. And often when they do, they leave a lot of their possessions behind. So, when faced with tenants who’ve done a runner, what rules, regulations and best practice do property managers have to follow? Across the country, there are clear legal guidelines about what to do with goods that have been abandoned on the premises by tenants. The rules outline what, when and how the goods should be stored and then disposed of if the tenant cannot be located. Sometimes, the relevant tribunal needs to be involved, especially if the lease had not ended when the tenants disappeared. Real Estate Institute of NSW president John Cunningham said best practice can help to prevent tenants abandoning a property – but it can still catch property managers unawares. “Clearly one of the first indicators is really getting behind in the rent … if they keep promising to fix it up but they don’t it’s a pretty clear indicator,” he said. “You can try to predict it through your own periodic inspections three to four times a year to see if there’s anything looking unusual. “If there’s any likelihood of (abandoning the property) happening it’s going to be a pretty observant agent to notice anything strange going on. In most cases you’re just caught short. You find out too late and they’re gone.” According to NSW Fair Trading, goods of value need to be kept for at least 14 days from the day of notification to the tenant. Personal documents need to be kept in a safe place for at least 90 days. In Queensland, according to the Residential Tenancies Authority, after a 30-day storage period has expired – depending on the type of goods left behind – they must be disposed of by auction unless the tribunal orders another method. Real Estate Institute of Queensland CEO Antonia Mercorella said tenants abandoning a rental property caused a problem for all parties. “Unfortunately, despite the utmost diligence as a property manager, sometimes a tenant will abandon the property and abandon their belongings, which presents a huge headache for everyone,” she said. “It’s quite complicated and any property manager facing this situation needs to be well armed with information before they take any action. “This includes when they can – and can’t – sell the abandoned goods, how long they are required to store goods for, and exactly how to inventory all the goods correctly and what to do with that inventory.” In Victoria, according to the Real Estate Institute of Victoria (REIV), goods of monetary value can be disposed if the total estimated cost of removal, storage and sale of all those goods is greater than its combined monetary value. Abandoned goods that cannot be disposed of must be stored for 28 days and the former tenant notified within seven days by sending notice to a forwarding address or, if not known, by publishing a notice in a newspaper. “The Victorian Residential Tenancies Act is currently being reviewed, and this issue is being considered at present,” REIV chief executive officer Geoff White said. “The REIV would like to see the act amended so that landlords can claim these expenses from a tenant’s bond after they vacate, which would help to offset the cost of storage.” So what’s the rules for your state? NSW If unsure whether the premises have been abandoned (if lease is still ongoing), apply to the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal. Tenants must be notified in writing (mailed to a forwarding address if known or to the property in case the tenant is having their mail redirected), in person or over the telephone. After two days, a notice can also be left in a prominent position somewhere on the premises (e.g. stuck to the front door) Goods of value need to be kept for at least 14 days from the day of notification. Personal documents need to be kept in a safe place for at least 90 days from the day of notification. Unclaimed goods can be disposed of by donating to charity, taken to the tip, or sold for a fair value with proceeds going to the tenant. After six years, unclaimed monies should be sent to the Office of State Revenue. Victoria Abandoned personal documents must for stored for at least 90 days and reasonable steps taken to notify the tenant. Goods of monetary value can be disposed if the total estimated cost of removal, storage and sale of all those goods is greater than combined monetary value of all those goods. Abandoned goods which cannot be disposed of must be stored for 28 days and the former tenant notified within seven days (by sending notice to forwarding address or, if not known, by publishing notice in newspaper). If not reclaimed within 28 days, goods can be sold at public auction as soon as possible but the auction must be advertised in the newspaper at least 14 days beforehand. Queensland After the tenancy agreement has ended, goods left behind by the tenant can be disposed where: the total market value of the goods is less than $1500, or; storage of the goods would be unhealthy or unsafe, or; storage of the goods would cause their market value to be completely or substantially reduced, or; the cost of removing, storing and selling the goods would be greater than the amount raised in the sale of the goods. If the goods do not fall into one of the above categories, the goods must be stored for one month. After the storage period has expired, the goods must be disposed of by auction unless the tribunal orders their disposal by another method. A notice of the auction must be placed in a newspaper circulating in the area where the goods were abandoned. Any money remaining from the proceeds of the sale must be paid to the Public Trustee within 10 days of the sale. Sources: NSW Fair Trading, Real Estate Institute of Victoria, Residential Tenancies Authority Queensland

Sunday, February 05, 2017

Pence defends Trump's criticism of judge who blocked travel

Wed Feb 8, 2017 | 5:36 PM EST Legal battle over travel ban pits Trump's powers against his own words The James R. Browning U.S. Court of Appeals Building, home of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, is pictured in San Francisco, California February 7, 2017. Reuters/Noah Berger Legal battle over travel ban pits Trump's powers By Mica Rosenberg | NEW YORK A U.S. appeals court is weighing arguments for and against President Donald Trump's temporary travel ban, but its decision this week may not yet answer the underlying legal questions being raised in the fast-moving case. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco is expected to rule only on the narrow question of whether a lower court's emergency halt to an executive order by Trump was justified. Trump signed the order on Jan. 27 barring citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries for 90 days and halted all refugee entries for four months. The appeals court has several options. It could kick the case back to lower court judge James Robart in Seattle, saying it is premature for them to make a ruling before he has had a chance to consider all the evidence. Robart stopped Trump's order just a week after he issued it and before all the arguments had been developed on both sides. Or the panel of three appellate judges could side with the government and find halting the order was harmful to national security, reinstating it while the case continues. Their decision is "one step in what will be a long, historic case," Stephen Yale-Loehr, a professor at Cornell University Law School who specializes in immigration. Ultimately, the case is likely to end up in the U.S. Supreme Court, legal experts said. The case is the first serious test of executive authority since Trump became president on Jan. 20, and legal experts said there were three main issues at play for the judiciary. The broad questions in the case are whether the states have the right to challenge federal immigration laws, how much power the court has to question the president's national security decisions, and if the order discriminates against Muslims. Washington state filed the original lawsuit, claiming it was hurt by the ban when students and faculty from state-run universities and corporate employees were stranded overseas. Trump administration lawyer August Flentje argued at an appeals court hearing on Tuesday that the states lack "standing" to sue the federal government over immigration law, but his arguments were questioned by the judges.   NATIONAL SECURITY If the court decides the states are allowed to bring the case, the next major question is about the limits of the president's power. "Historically courts have been exceedingly deferential to governmental actions in the immigration area," said Jonathan Adler, a Case Western Reserve University School of Law professor. Though, he added, "the way they carried it out understandably makes some people, and perhaps some courts, uneasy with applying the traditional rules." Trump issued the order late on a Friday and caused chaos at airports as officials struggled to quickly change procedures. At Tuesday's hearing, Judge Richard Clifton, an appointee of Republican president George W. Bush and Judge William Canby, an appointee of Democratic president Jimmy Carter, pushed the government to explain what would happen if Trump simply decided to ban all Muslims from entering the United States. "Would anybody be able to challenge that?" Canby asked. Flentje emphasized that the order did not ban Muslims. He said the president made a determination about immigration policy based on a legitimate assessment of risk. The government has said its order is grounded in a law passed by congress that allows the president to suspend the entry of "any class of aliens" that he deems "would be detrimental to the interests of the United States." When asked by the third judge - Michelle Friedland, appointed by Democrat Barack Obama - if that meant the president's decisions are "unreviewable" Flentje, after a pause, answered "yes." When pressed, Flentje acknowledged, however, that constitutional concerns had been raised about the order.   RELIGIOUS DISCRIMINATION One of the main concerns is allegations by the states, civil rights groups, some lawmakers and citizens that the order discriminates in violation of the constitution's First Amendment, which prohibits favoring one religion over another. The judges will have to decide whether to look exclusively at the actual text of the president's order, which does not mention any particular religion, or consider outside comments by Trump and his team to discern their intent. Washington state's attorney Noah Purcell told the hearing that even though the lawsuit is at an early stage, the amount of evidence that Trump intended to discriminate against Muslims is "remarkable." It cited Trump's campaign promises of a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States." In a tweet on Monday night, Trump said "the threat from radical Islamic terrorism is very real" urging the courts to act quickly. Government lawyer Flentje countered Purcell by saying there was danger in second guessing Trump's decision-making about U.S. security "based on some newspaper articles." Clifton asked about statements on Fox News by Trump adviser Rudolph Giuliani, former New York mayor and former prosecutor, that Trump had asked him to figure out how to make a Muslim ban legal. "Do you deny that in fact the statements attributed to then candidate Trump and to his political advisers and most recently Mr. Giuliani?" Clifton asked. "Either those types of statements were made or not," said Clifton. "If they were made it is potential evidence." (Reporting by Mica Rosenberg in New York; Additional reporting by Lawrence Hurley in Washington and Nathan Layne in New York; Editing by Noeleen Walder and Grant McCool)  Brief opposition Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed one of the first lawsuits seeking to block President Trump's executive order enacting a travel ban from seven Muslim-majority countries. Minnesota signed on as co-plaintiff and attorneys general from 17 other states and the District of Columbia signed an amicus brief against the order. Five states that Trump won in the presidential election -- North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Iowa, Mississippi and Kentucky -- have elected Democratic attorneys general, though only the first three signed the brief. Two states that went for Clinton, Colorado and Nevada, have elected Republican attorneys general but have not signed the brief. Voted for Trump Voted for Clinton Opposed travel ban Wis. N.J. Mich. N.Y. Kan. Iowa W.Va. Alaska Utah Tenn. Md. Penn. Ky. Neb. S.D. Wyo. Colo. Conn. S.C. N.C. La. Ind. Ill. Ariz. Calif. Miss. Nev. Del. Mass. Maine Vt. N.H. R.I. Hawaii N.D. Minn. Wash. Mont. Ore. N.M. Ark. Idaho Ohio Ga. Ala. Mo. Fla. Va. Texas Okla. D.C. NOTE: Hawaii filed its own suit and a brief supporting Washington. Source: Reuters By Travis Hartman | REUTERS GRAPHICS ============================================== Sun Feb 5, 2017 | 2:47 PM EST ban 7h ago | 01:30 Court rejects Trump appeal to restore travel ban Pence defends Trump's criticism of judge who block... X By Ayesha Rascoe and Yeganeh Torbati | WASHINGTON U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Sunday defended President Donald Trump's attack on a federal judge who blocked a travel ban on citizens of seven mainly Muslim nations, as the first major legal battle of the Trump administration intensified. Trump blasted Judge James Robart as a "so-called judge" on Saturday, a day after the Seattle jurist issued a temporary restraining order on the ban. A U.S. appeals court later on Saturday denied the government's request for an immediate stay of the ruling. "The president of the United States has every right to criticize the other two branches of government," Pence said on the NBC program "Meet the Press." It is unusual for a sitting president to attack a member of the judiciary, which the U.S. Constitution designates as a check on the power of the executive branch and Congress. Senator Patrick Leahy, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said Trump seems intent on precipitating a constitutional crisis. Some Republicans also expressed discomfort with the situation. "I think it is best not to single out judges for criticism," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on CNN's "State of the Union" program. "We all get disappointed from time to time at the outcome in courts on things that we care about. But I think it is best to avoid criticizing judges individually." Republican Senator Ben Sasse, a vocal critic of Trump, was less restrained. "We don't have so-called judges ... we don't have so-called presidents, we have people from three different branches of government who take an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution," he said on ABC News program "This Week." The ruling by Robart, appointed by former Republican President George W. Bush, along with the decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to deny the government's request for an immediate stay dealt a blow to Trump barely two weeks into his presidency. It could also be the precursor to months of legal challenges to Trump's push to clamp down on immigration, including through the construction of a wall on the U.S.-Mexican border. The businessman-turned-politician, who during his presidential campaign called for a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States, has vowed to reinstate the travel ban on citizens from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen and a 120-day bar on all refugees. He says the measures are needed to protect the United States from Islamist militants. Critics say they are unjustified and discriminatory. ADVERTISEMENT LEGAL UNCERTAINTY The legal limbo will prevail at least until the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rules on the government's application for a stay of Robart's ruling. The court is now awaiting further submissions from the states of Washington and Minnesota on Sunday, and from the government on Monday. The final filing is due at 1700 PST on Monday (0100 GMT on Tuesday). The uncertainty has created what may be a short-lived opportunity for travelers from the seven affected countries to get into the United States. "This is the first time I try to travel to America. We were booked to travel next week but decided to bring it forward after we heard," said a Yemeni woman, recently married to a U.S. citizen, who boarded a plane from Cairo to Turkey on Sunday to connect with a U.S.-bound flight. She declined to be named for fear it could complicate her entry to the United States. Reacting to the latest court ruling, Iraqi government spokesman Saad al-Hadithi said: "It is a move in the right direction to solve the problems that it caused." ‹ 14/14 Protesters demonstrate against U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration, in Hong Kong, China February 5, 2017. Reuters/Bobby Yip 1/14 Demonstrators in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 2/14 Demonstrators in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 3/14 A demonstrator against the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, protests at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 4/14 Demonstrators in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu - RTX2ZNMO 5/14 Demonstrators against the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 6/14 Demonstrators in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 7/14 A demonstrator against the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, protests at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 8/14 Mandy Adams, 70, of Los Angeles, holds a U.S. flag in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 9/14 Demonstrators in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 10/14 Police officers stand guard as demonstrators in support of and against the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu 11/14 Passengers arrive at O'Hare airport in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. February 4, 2017. Reuters/Kamil Krzaczynski 12/14 Lindley Hamlon, dressed as the Statue of Liberty, greets International travelers as they arrive at John F. Kennedy international airport in New York City, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Brendan McDermid 13/14 A demonstrator holds a sign to protest against U.S President Donald Trump's executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven primarily Muslim countries from entering the United States during a rally in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. February 4, 2017 Reuters/Tom Mihalek 14/14 Protesters demonstrate against U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration, in Hong Kong, China February 5, 2017. Reuters/Bobby Yip 1/14 Demonstrators in support of the immigration rules implemented by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration, rally at Los Angeles international airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., February 4, 2017. Reuters/Ringo Chiu › Trump's Jan. 27 travel restrictions have drawn protests in the United States, provoked criticism from U.S. allies and created chaos for thousands of people who have, in some cases, spent years seeking asylum. In his ruling on Friday, Robart questioned the use of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the United States as a justification for the ban, saying no attacks had been carried out on U.S. soil by individuals from the seven affected countries since then. For Trump's order to be constitutional, Robart said, it had to be "based in fact, as opposed to fiction". The 9/11 attacks were carried out by hijackers from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Lebanon, whose nationals were not affected by the order. In a series of tweets on Saturday, Trump attacked "the opinion of this so-called judge" as ridiculous. "What is our country coming to when a judge can halt a Homeland Security travel ban and anyone, even with bad intentions, can come into U.S.?" he asked. Trump told reporters at his private Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida late on Saturday: "We'll win. For the safety of the country we'll win." Related Coverage VIDEOIraqi family flies to New York after blow to Trump ban VIDEOHong Kong holds anti-Trump protest Iraq says ruling against Trump travel ban is move in right direction The Justice Department appeal criticized Robart's legal reasoning, saying it violated the separation of powers and stepped on the president's authority as commander-in-chief. The appeal said the state of Washington lacked standing to challenge the order and denied that the order "favors Christians at the expense of Muslims." INFLUX EXPECTED The U.S. State Department and Department of Homeland Security said they were complying with Robart's order and many visitors are expected to start arriving on Sunday, while the government said it expects to begin admitting refugees again onMonday. A spokesman for the International Organization for Migration, Leonard Doyle, confirmed on Sunday that about 2,000 refugees are ready to travel to the United States. "We expect a small number of refugees to arrive in the U.S. on Monday, Feb. 6th. They are mainly from Jordan and include people fleeing war and persecution in Syria," he said in an email. Iraqi Fuad Sharef, his wife and three children spent two years obtaining U.S. visas. They had packed up to move to America last week, but were turned back to Iraq after a failed attempt to board a U.S.-bound flight from Cairo. On Sunday, the family checked in for a Turkish Airlines flight to New York from Istanbul. "Yeah, we are very excited. We are very happy," Sharef told Reuters TV. "Finally, we have been cleared. We are allowed to enter the United States." Rana Shamasha, 32, an Iraqi refugee in Lebanon, was due to travel to the United States with her two sisters and mother on Feb. 1 to join relatives in Detroit until the trip was canceled as a result of the travel ban. She is now waiting to hear from U.N. officials overseeing their case. "If they tell me there is a plane tomorrow morning, I will go. If they tell me there is one in an hour, I will go," she told Reuters by telephone in Beirut. "I no longer have a house here, work, or anything," she said. (Additional reporting by Chris Michaud, Lin Noueihed, David Shepardson and Reuters TV; Writing by Ayesha Rascoe; Editing by Paul Simao and Mary Milliken)